Colorado deaths stoke worries about pot edibles

Edible marijuana products are pictured on display at a medical marijuana dispensary in Denver on Friday, April 18, 2014. Many of the items are far more potent than a single marijuana joint. Two recent deaths have raised concerns about Colorado's recreational marijuana industry and the effects of the drug, especially since cookies, candy and other pot edibles can be exponentially more potent than a smoked joint. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)DENVER (AP) — A college student eats more than the recommended dose of a marijuana-laced cookie and jumps to his death from a hotel balcony. A husband with no history of violence is accused of shooting his wife in the head, possibly after eating pot-infused candy.



US delays review of contentious Keystone pipeline

President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, April 18, 2014, where he presented the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy to the United States Naval Academy football team. The Obama administration is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is extending indefinitely its review of the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections.



Study: Half of jailed NYC youths have brain injury

NEW YORK (AP) — About half of all 16- to 18-year-olds coming into New York City's jails say they had a traumatic brain injury before being incarcerated, most caused by assaults, according to a new study that's the latest in a growing body of research documenting head trauma among young offenders.
Mazda recalls 109,000 older SUVs for rust problem

DETROIT (AP) — Mazda is recalling 109,000 Tribute SUVs to fix rusting frame parts.
Nobel winner Garcia Marquez, master of magical realism, dies at 87

Residents pay homage in front of the house of Colombian Nobel Prize laureate Garcia Marquez in AracatacaBy Anahi Rama MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the Colombian author whose beguiling stories of love and longing brought Latin America to life for millions of readers and put magical realism on the literary map, died on Thursday. A prolific writer who started out as a newspaper reporter, Garcia Marquez's masterpiece was "One Hundred Years of Solitude," a dream-like, dynastic epic that helped him win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982. Garcia Marquez died at his home in Mexico City, where he had returned from hospital last week after a bout of pneumonia. Known affectionately to friends and fans as "Gabo," Garcia Marquez was Latin America's best-known and most beloved author and his books have sold in the tens of millions.





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