Oregon militants acquitted of conspiracy in wildlife refuge seizure

Ammon Bundy talks to occupiers in an office at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, OregonA federal court jury delivered a surprise verdict on Thursday acquitting anti-government militant leader Ammon Bundy and six followers of conspiracy charges stemming from their role in the armed takeover of a wildlife center in Oregon earlier this year. The outcome marked a stinging defeat for federal prosecutors and law enforcement in a trial the defendants sought to turn into a pulpit for airing their opposition to U.S. government control over millions of acres of public lands in the West. Bundy and others, including his brother and co-defendant Ryan Bundy, cast the 41-day occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge as a patriotic act of civil disobedience.

In Germany, Syrians find mosques too conservative

Refugees and Turks pray during Friday prayers at the Turkish Kuba Camii mosque located near a hotel housing refugees in Cologne's district of KalkBy Joseph Nasr COLOGNE, Germany (Reuters) - Hani Salam escaped civil war in Syria and survived the journey from Egypt to Europe. Syrians in Germany say many of the country's Arab mosques are more conservative than those at home. People have criticized the way the newcomers dress and practise their religion, they said.

Police arrest 141 in crackdown on North Dakota pipeline protesters

A line of police move towards a roadblock and encampment of Native American and environmental protesters near an oil pipeline construction site, near the town of Cannon BallPolice arrested 141 Native Americans and other protesters in North Dakota in a tense standoff that spilled into Friday morning between law enforcement and demonstrators seeking to halt construction of a disputed oil pipeline. Police in riot gear used pepper spray and armored vehicles in an effort to disperse an estimated 330 protesters and clear a camp on private property in the path of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline, according to photos and statements released by the Morton County Sheriff's Department.

Q&A: Fish and politics behind Antarctic marine reserve deal

In this Jan. 25, 2015 photo, Chile's Navy ship Aquiles moves alongside the Hurd Peninsula, seen from Livingston Islands, in Antarctica. The countries that decide the fate of Antarctica agreed on Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, to create the world's largest marine protected area in the ocean next to the frozen continent. The agreement comes after years of diplomatic wrangling and high-level talks between the U.S. and Russia, which has rejected the idea in the past.(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Nations from around the world on Friday reached an historic agreement to preserve an area of ocean near Antarctica that's about twice the size of Texas. Here are some questions and answers about the deal:

Rancher yearns for Trump wall on US-Mexico border

Cattle rancher Jim Chilton demonstrates how easy it is to cross the US-Mexico border on part of his 50,000 acre ranch southeast of Arivaca, ArizonaTo many, Donald Trump's pledge to build a wall along the US-Mexico border is unrealistic. The 77-year-old, a fifth-generation rancher on the Arizona border with Mexico, says he has grown weary of seeing drug smugglers -- rather than just cattle -- on his ranch and a wall is the answer to his troubles. "I really admire Trump for having the insight and the knowledge to know what's wrong with the current border system," he said, as he surveyed the sprawling desert plains of his 75-square-mile ranch that stretches to the Mexican border.

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